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Review: Ruby Cactus Amigurumi Crochet Project Kit

It's been a while since I've shared a crochet project, so I couldn't resist this adorable cactus kit from Global Backyard Industries. They sent me 1 kit of my choosing (there are two cactus styles, Ruby and Charley) in exchange for my honest review. I've never been great at keeping plants alive myself, and a certain grey cat has a propensity to eat anything green and vaguely plant-like that comes into the house. So a plant that I can't kill and the cat (probably) won't try to eat is something I can really get excited about!
Image via Global Backyard Industries website

What impressed me the most when I received my Ruby kit was that it truly did include everything you needed, right down to the poly-fil stuffing.While I appreciate a good scavenger hunt, realizing you need a straw or don't have the right crochet hook can really be a momentum killer. They also source materials and supplies from American sources whenever possible, which is pretty cool (the company itself is run by a husband and wife team and based in Seattle).

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Kit contents
As you know, I'm still very much a beginning crocheter. This kit was right at my skill level, as it didn't require much more than simple stitches (single crochet, chain stitch, slip stitch, and a singe crochet decrease). Some of the pattern instructions and terminology took some getting used to because I am still learning how to read crochet patterns in general (side note - I find there is way more variation in terms and how things are written in crochet patterns vs. knitting patterns. Is it just me?!). For this kit, most of my problems cam from overthinking, but luckily there is a YouTube video link included with the instructions. When I got stuck, it helped me decipher a few instructions that I wasn't 100% confident on.

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Each piece before assembly
It was the perfect weekend project: I made all of the pieces on Saturday afternoon, then assembled them all in under an hour on Sunday. I did take a few liberties when creating my cactus (it's how I roll), and I think I may have overstuffed the pot, but overall I think it turned out well. And it looks great on display in my knitting library, doesn't it?

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With the holidays just around the corner, this is a great idea for the intrepid crafter on your list. Each kit is just $29.099, and can purchase them through the Global Backyard Industries website; they also have some very cool coloring books and other craft supplies that are worth checking out!

You may like to know: I received this kit for free in exchange for my review. All opinions are my own.

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